SCHEDULE

Food included with Registration

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Saturday
April 14th,  2018

 

9:00am-9:30am Breakfast (Coffee, Tea, and Food) and Sign-In

9:30am-12:00pm Opening Keynote Speaker

12:00pm-1:30pm Lunch (Asian Cuisine) and Poster Session

1:30pm-3:30pm Breakout Sessions

3:30pm-4:00pm Break (Snacks)

4:00pm-5:30pm Closing Keynote Speaker 

 

9:00am-9:30am Breakfast (Coffee, Tea, and Food) and Sign-In

9:30am-12:00pm Opening Keynote Speaker

12:00pm-1:30pm Lunch (Asian Cuisine) and Poster Session

1:30pm-3:30pm Breakout Sessions

3:30pm-4:00pm Break (Snacks)

4:00pm-5:30pm Closing Keynote Speaker 

Schedule

9:00am-9:30am Breakfast (Coffee, Tea, and Food) and Sign-In

9:30am-12:00pm Opening Keynote Speaker

12:00pm-1:30pm Lunch (Asian Cuisine) and Poster Session

1:30pm-3:30pm Breakout Sessions

3:30pm-4:00pm Break (Snacks)

4:00pm-5:30pm Closing Keynote Speaker 

Keynote Descriptions:

  • Opening Keynote by Jason Platt, Ph.D.: "Therapeutic Spaces in Public Spaces: Alternative Ideas for Community Work following a Natural Disaster"

This presentation will outline how inventive non-US theories and clinical approaches can be used to meet the mental health needs of underserved communities following a natural disaster. Participants will learn about how Latin American originating theories such as liberation psychology, theater of the oppressed and critical pedagogy can be integrated with single session therapy. Participants will also learn a rationale for why therapeutic work must not be confined to therapy rooms and how therapeutic work can take place in public spaces. Participants will learn about examples of how these ideas were applied following the 7.1 magnitude earthquake in Mexico that caused nearly fifty buildings to collapse and resulted in the death of more than 370 people.

  • Closing Keynote by Manijeh Daneshpour, Ph.D.: "Battle of Trauma Queens: Man versus Nature"

Escalating literature identifies the impact of man-made and natural disasters on the emotional functioning of individuals and families and how failure to receive adequate treatment could result in serious long-term effects. There is an obvious need for treatment models that focus on individual as well as families. However, a systemic approach is important in working with disasters because it goes beyond the individual by examining macro-systemic social and environmental functioning, which embraces the extended system within which the family is embedded. This presentation will address the emotional and psychological impact of both man-made and natural disasters. It is highly relevant to mental health as recent global events have raised awareness of the need for effective treatment models for families in crisis.

 

Breakout Sessions:

Session One: Room B102

  • Rebecca Bokoch, Psy.D. and Brittany Aliado, M.A.: "Mindfulness: A Gateway to Compassion, Acceptance, and Peace in the Face of Suffering"

Mindfulness and compassion can mitigate the impact of trauma and help communities dealing with "disaster." The presenters will briefly review the research supporting the beneficial effects of mindfulness on anxiety, depression, pain, and trauma. This presentation will explore how mindfulness and compassion can help communities in the wake of disaster to heal from pain, suffering, and trauma. The presenters will explore the relationship between suffering and compassion in the framework of Mindful Self-Compassion, and the foundations of peace and acceptance in Mindfulness theory. The presentation will also identify leaders in the field of mindfulness who have used these concepts in their leadership style to help communities to heal from disaster, suffering, and trauma and to overcome adversity, such as the Dalai Lama and Thich Nhat Hanh. Participants will also be led in a brief mindfulness meditation practice (breathing in suffering, breathing out compassion), to experience the healing benefits of mindfulness and compassion.

 

  • Kelsey Harrold, M.A. and Laura Gutierrez Duarte, M.A.: "Conducting Single Sessions"

The presenters will be explaining the definition of single session therapy, including what a single session is, the typical structure of a single session, and what it means to conduct a single session. Presenters will also describe any stylistic factors and interventions that may be included or needed when conducting a single session. Information on the application of single session, and possible modifications, will also be provided. Then, presenters will highlight the importance of using single sessions with communities in the wake of disaster. Finally the presenters will provide time for questions, discussion, and reflection around the topic of single sessions.

  • Tami Gavron, Ph.D.: "The Healing Power of Art: An Art-Based Psychosocial Intervention with Tsunami Survivors in Japan" (Pre-recorded video presentation with live facilitator, Noah Hass-Cohen, Psy.D.)

The presentation will describe an art-based psychosocial intervention that took place in Japan with tsunami survivors during the years 2011-2014. This presentation will emphasize the healing power of art with natural disaster survivors as a humanitarian action. However, an emphasis is put on the importance of cultural sensitivity and ethical dilemmas which arise from working with such a different culture. On March 2011, Japan was hit by the most powerful earthquake (9.0), followed by a large Tsunami, leaving 30,000 dead and 250,000 homeless. The earthquake caused serious damage to the nuclear plant in Fukushima, resulting in dangerous radioactive emissions. The psychosocial intervention took place through IsraAID, which is an Israeli non-profit organization that works with survivors from natural disasters. The aim was to train mental health workers, teachers and community representatives who were survivors themselves, in the art-based psychosocial intervention. The presentation will describe the use of artistic expression after a shared traumatic event that allowed for an opportunity to mourn, find meaning and regain sense of continuity and connection, which leads to resilience. However, every culture is unique and every disaster is different; hence recovery strategies were specific and attuned to the particular community involved. It was imperative to use culturally sensitive approaches and have respect and knowledge of the Japanese culture. As a result of this way of thinking, the artistic activity, used local materials, and was connected to Japanese artistic culture and history. The presentation will stress sensitive culture-bases interventions, and provide examples from group art-based intervention methods which demonstrate respect to Japanese general and artistic culture, while emphasizing the healing power of art.

Session Two: Room B108 

  • Nicole Sabatini Gutierrez, Psy.D.: "Understanding the Risks and Potential Effects of Vicarious Traumatization When Treating Sexual Trauma"

Dr. Sabatini Gutierrez will review the risks and red flags of burnout (aka compassion fatigue) that often occurs in psychotherapists who work with very at-risk and highly traumatized clients. If burnout is not attended to, therapists can develop vicarious traumatization, which can affect their mental and emotional health, and their ability to practice effectively. Symptoms of vicarious traumatization are parallel to the symptoms of PTSD and other trauma-related mental health disorders. Dr. Sabatini Gutierrez will present the results from an original qualitative study that explored the experiences of female therapists who specialized in treating sexual trauma, and identified the effects of vicarious traumatization on participants’ sexual identities and intimate partner relationships. This presentation will help attendees learn how to address burnout to prevent the development of vicarious trauma and minimize the effects of treating survivors of sexual trauma on the self-of-the-therapist.

  • Alba Nino, Ph.D. and Megan Hawker, Psy.D.: "The Experience of Post-Traumatic Growth and its Therapeutic Possibilities with Veteran Populations"

Posttraumatic growth (PTG) refers to the positive psychological outcomes that some individuals experience following a traumatic experience or event. Some individuals report responses which may include: recognition of personal strength, improved or enhanced spirituality, increased appreciation for life, improved relationships with others and/or the realization of new possibilities. In previous studies, veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have reported growth in all these areas, and have described some of the factors that have contributed to this growth. PTG does not exist in isolation nor is it at the opposite side of the spectrum of distress or post-traumatic stress symptoms. Distress can be a pathway to reach a higher level of development and well-being. Clinicians and mental health providers are in a unique position to not only support stress response mitigation, but also to promote growth with their clients. Through serving as “expert companions”, clinicians can support veteran clients who have experienced the traumas of war, highlight strengths and help manage distress. Clinicians can help support these clients in the development of a new narrative which incorporates the trauma and the positive outcomes with which it is associated.

  • Alba Nino, Ph.D.: "Person of the Therapist Work as a Form of Self-Care"

As therapists, we are frequently reminded of the risks of compassion fatigue and burnout that are inherent to our profession. We are also reminded of the importance of self-care to prevent these risks. However, many times we are left to our own devices in trying to figure out how to practice self-care. Another reminder that we constantly hear is the importance of the work on the self of therapist. And even though we can recognize how vital this work is for remaining clinically competent for our clients, how to do this type of work seems to be unclear. In this presentation, we will explore how a specific perspective on self of the therapist work (The Person of the Therapist Training [POTT]) can serve not only to help clinicians enhance their therapeutic effectiveness, but also to develop a more self-caring and self-accepting attitude. Rather than focusing on identifying and resolving personal issues that might get in the way of effective therapeutic work, POTT is an approach that promotes accepting our imperfect humanity and using our own experiences and struggles as assets in our clinical work. Clinicians who have been trained in the POTT model have described how this process helped them have a better understanding of themselves, and become less self-critical and more self-compassionate.

Session Three: Room B145

  • Denise Lopez, Ph.D.: "Organizational Social Responsibility: What is and what should be business organizations’ response to disasters?"

Organizational psychologists and business leaders have typically been associated with increasing employee productivity, pursuing operational efficiencies and maximizing profitability and shareholder value. More recently though, there have been more discussions about organizational ethics, specifically business’s role in doing good. In this presentation, we will discuss why and how businesses can respond effectively to natural or human instigated disasters. We will explore how different business organizations responded to natural disasters like Hurricanes Katrina, Harvey and Irma as well as major oil spills.  We will share best-practice examples such as how companies like Walmart have responded to disasters in major ways, not just to assist employees and their families but also to assist entire communities in need. We will discuss changes that can be made to organizational culture, leadership and employee training, communication, reward and recognition systems, and other areas which will reinforce “doing good” as a more integral part of the corporate DNA.

  • Janie Pinterits, Ph.D.: "Crisis, Trauma, and Fenceline Communities

In 2017 Hurricane Arthur lead to oil refineries releasing almost 1,000,000 pounds of carcinogenic emissions into the air.  US industrial complexes dump 9 million tons of toxins into the environment annually (NAACP, 2017).  Fenceline communities are those directly bordering polluting industries. The poverty rate in these communities is 50% higher than for the US communities as a whole. Additionally, most fenceline residents are people of color. In this interactive presentation we will discuss the mental health impacts of living adjacent to toxic industrial facilities or hazardous waste sites.  Toxic exposure can come in the form of chronic air and water pollution, illegal dumping, public policy decisions (e.g., the 2014 Flint MI water crisis; Cuthbertson et al, 2016), industrial accidents, natural disasters, and more.  The adverse health impacts of include respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses and cancers (Brender et. al, 2001).  Mental health hazards specifically can include PTSD, depression, chronic stress anxiety, fear and anger (Cuthbertson et al, 2016). Mental health professionals should bear in mind group level as well as individual level impacts for fenceline communities, e.g., perceptions of neighborhood disorder and powerlessness (Downey, et. al, 2005). What role can mental health professionals play with clients of fenceline communities? What culturally responsive practices are needed?  What would social justice advocacy look like?  We will examine the ecosystems framework and the Advocacy Competencies (Lancaster et. al, 2015) to explore strategies for action. 

  • Sharon Ellerman, B.A., M.A. candidate: "The Double Impact of Disasters on Disadvantaged Communities"

Sharon will review the impacts of global climate change on vulnerable populations and mass trauma management.  Hurricane Maria loomed over Puerto Rico starting on September 16th, 2017 pouring catastrophe for 17 days on an island already hit by 11 years of economic recession.  Disadvantaged communities with poor infrastructure and limited resources to protect themselves were left exposed to the dangerous elements.  While for others, disabilities made evacuation impossible.  Many families in Puerto Rico continue to lack basic necessities with psychiatric crisis on the rise.  Sharon will review climate change and the disproportionate impact on disadvantaged communities, as well as critical factors in recovery efforts.  She will discuss the unique challenges both in the immediate and long-term recovery from Hurricane Maria and its implications in advocacy for other disadvantaged communities around the world.

 

Session Four: Room B120/122

  • Branson Boykins, Ph.D: "Understanding Implicit Racial Biases and Subsequent Trauma"

Implicit biases are demonstrations of bias where favoritism and/or discrimination occurs, but the individual is unaware of their preferences (Abreu, 1999; Boysen & Vogel, 2008; Greenwald & Krieger, 2006).  Thus, leaving the individual unaware of how previous experiences have shaped their behavior and maintain various types of racial discrimination. Whereas, biases are traditionally seen as overt and manifested through conscious beliefs that are easily avoidable.  Recently, researchers (Abreu, 1999; Boysen & Vogel, 2008; Greenwald & Banaji, 1995) contend that biases are more evident today in a contemporary implicit manner, even in the field of counseling. With the emergence of implicit racial biases, research has been limited to guide the field on how to intervene or mitigate such counselor bias.

  • Dorothy O'Neill, Psy.D.: "Picking up the emotional pieces after a mass shooting; Working with traumatized families and victims, and understanding how to hold yourself together"

Dr. O’Neill will describe her experience of being the provider after the devastating shooting attack in Las Vegas October 2017. The number of victims after the LV attack was overwhelming. Many had no idea what to do with their trauma and were at a loss why they felt the way they did.  Dr. O’Neill will focus on how she worked with the clients to process the shock, and to help them repair. In addition, Dr. O’Neill will share how she was able to deal with the overwhelming amount of trauma without being traumatized herself.

  • Emily Duval, M.A.: "Suicide Post-vention: Coping in the Aftermath of Death by Suicide and Working with Survivor Grief"

This workshop has been presented in the United Kingdom and California to attendee groups comprised of professional therapists, volunteers, educators, students and social workers.  The subject of suicide is often taboo and survivors of this type of loss face many obstacles during their grief process, including guilt, shame, rage, and the judgement of social stigma. Learn about the Survivor experience, barriers to healing, and become mindful of building a compassionate community.